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North Dakota Content Standards

High School Social Studies Standards

Standard 1: Students apply social studies skills and resources.
Benchmark Expectations:

VISUAL REPRESENTATIONS
9–12.1.1 Interpret and evaluate various visual representations (e.g. charts, graphs, timelines, graphic organizers, maps, flow charts) of data.
PRIMARY AND SECONDARY RESOURCES
9–12.1.2 Employ, interpret, and evaluate documents (e.g., primary and secondary sources, fact, fiction or opinion) to enhance the understanding of social studies content.
RESEARCH PROCESSES
9–12.1.3 Collect, organize, evaluate, and synthesize information using the research processes (e.g., questioning techniques, research paper, presentation, mini-essays, debates, current events analysis).
9–12.1.4 Use media (e.g., oral, written, websites, computer simulations, multimedia resources) to access, record, analyze, and communicate information relating to social studies.
9–12.1.5 Apply social studies skills (e.g., recognize cause and effect, trends, multiple perspectives, change) in real-life contexts (e.g., backtracking current global issues, Model U.N., mock trials, simulated congressional hearings, parliamentary debates, comparative statistical analysis, mental maps, GPS, GIS).
BIAS AND PREJUDICE
9–12.1.6 Analyze the impact of bias and prejudice in historical and contemporary media.

 

Standard 2: Students understand important historical events.
Benchmark Expectations:

TRIBAL ISSUES
9–12.2.1 Analyze federal policy and action regarding American Indians (e.g. Dawes Act, changes in federal and state Indian policies, civil rights movement, housing, distribution of wealth, healthcare, Indian Reorganization Act, Bureau of Indian Affairs, citizenship).
U.S. PERIODS, EVENTS, FIGURES, MOVEMENTS TO INCLUDE BUT NOT LIMITED TO INDUSTRIALIZATION TO PRESENT
9–12.2.2 Examine the transformation of the nation (e.g., immigration, political/social reformers, urbanization, mechanization of agriculture).
9–12.2.3 Trace the causes, course, and legacy of the United States’ involvement in World War I at home and abroad (e.g., neutrality, isolationism, home front).
9–12.2.4 Analyze the major political, economic, and social developments that occurred between World War I and World War II (e.g. Roaring 20s, Great Depression, New Deal).
9–12.2.5 Trace the causes, course, and legacy of World War II (e.g., home front).
9–12.2.7 Analyze the origins, foreign policy, events, and domestic consequences of the Cold War (e.g. missile build-up in North Dakota, Grand Forks and Minot Air Force Bases, fallout shelters, Oscar Zero).
9–12.2.11 Analyze the major social issues and popular culture of contemporary U.S. (e.g. immigration, poverty, and discrimination).

 

Standard 3: Students understand economic concepts and the characteristics of various economic systems.
Benchmark Expectations:

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION
9–12.3.2 Explain the role of money and the role of financial institutions in a market economy (e.g., basic functions of money, composition of money supply, role of banks and other financial institutions, federal reserve, credit savings)
9–12.3.4 Analyze the role government plays in an economy (e.g., provision of public goods and services, taxes, protection of property rights, resolution of market failures)

 

Standard 4: Students understand the development, functions, and forms of various political systems and the role of the citizen in government and society.
Benchmark Expectations:

TRIBAL ISSUES
9–12.4.1 Explain how political and economic forces have affected the sovereignty of tribal nations (e.g., laws used in forming the basis of the federal-tribal relationship; political and economic forces affecting sovereignty of tribal nations).
HISTORICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS
9–12.4.2 Compare the nature and source of various types of political entities past and present throughout the world (e.g., ancient Greek and Roman political thought; classical republicans; philosophy of natural rights; limited and unlimited governments; constitutional governments; representative democracy; con-federal, federal, unitary systems of government, and international organizations)
9–12.4.3 Analyze the content and context of documents, events, and organizations that influenced and established the United States (e.g., Magna Carta; English common law; Petition of Right; English Bill of Rights; 1st and 2nd Continental Congresses; Common Sense; Declaration of Independence, American Revolution Articles of Confederation; Constitutional Convention; Federalist Papers, Anti-Federalist Papers; U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights)
HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PROCESSES
9–12.4.4 Evaluate the effectiveness of structures, operations, and influences of political systems and constitutional governments (e.g., federalism; separation of powers; checks and balances; media and special interest groups)
9–12.4.5 Analyze historical and contemporary examples of civil liberties and civil rights in the U.S. (e.g., incorporation of the Bill of Rights, amendments, key legislation, and landmark Supreme Court cases)
RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF CITIZENS
9–12.4.6 Examine the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and civic participation.

 

Standard 5: Students understand and apply concepts of geography.
Benchmark Expectations:

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
9–12.5.1 Analyze the Earth’s human systems (e.g., population, culture, settlement).
INTERACTION BETWEEN HUMAN AND PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
9–12.5.2 Interpret the relationships between physical environments and society (e.g., humans modify environment, environment modifies society, and use, distribution, and importance of resources).

 

Standard 6: Students understand the importance of culture, individual identity, and group identity.
Benchmark Expectations:

GROUP INTERACTION
9–12.6.1 Trace group and cultural influences as they contribute to human development, identity, and behavior (e.g., religion, education, media, government, and economy).
9–12.6.2 Evaluate various meanings of social groups, general implications of group membership, political groups).